Nissan leaf software hack

think, that you are mistaken..

Category: Nissan leaf software hack

Catch up on stories from the past week and beyond at the Slashdot story archive. Perhaps Nissan knows something about their batteries and BMS that he doesn't, and the false zero reading is there to ensure the batteries last as long as they're intended to? Last I heard, you weren't supposed to completely discharge lithium batteries if you wanted to ensure a usefully long service life. Taking cells all the way to 'zero' in a battery is generally a bad plan, it both stresses the cells more - discharging them at high currents at the very end of the discharge is harsh on them, causes extra wear due to deeper cycle life, and risks overdischarging weaker cells in the battery.

Li-Ion doesn't like full discharges, and in fact the internal circuitry should make it impossible. Lead-acid will very quickly become unusable if left fully discharged. And for battery packs, full discharge risks cell reversal, which causes damage.

The only case where you should still do that is when there is some sort of internal statistics being kept of how long the battery is estimated to last, which is out of sync with the actual battery.

That's not for any sort of cleaning though. It's just for fixing incorrect estimations of remaining battery time, which causes devices to turn off too soon, or have them fail to shut down nicely before the battery runs out.

It's worth noting that even in this case, the cells don't actually go to zero - in LiIon batteries, the circuitry cuts out at about 3V per cell. Lower than that, and damage WILL occur. I've come across this kind of thing on other "high-end" Li-Ion batteries too, including on laptops, a high-end GPS unit and a satellite comms system. I've never seen this kind of thing on cheaper clones, in lower-end devices like phones, or in any other gadgets where the battery might be regarded as disposable once it deteriorates.

Unless the battery in question has a means of asking for a calibration charge, or some such, and a charger that has a dedicated mode for doing so, then you should always try and recharge the battery before it fully drains. Your perception is its "high end" because it gets you involved in the recalibration process. The cheap ones recalibrate, they just don't let you know, therefore you perceive them as cheaper.

No, it isn't so simple. There are many examples of expensive devices requiring many more manual steps because it gives the perception of value. Other times, it is simply a status thing. For example, I have a solar powered watch that is synced to the atomic clock in Colorado every morning. My watch will always be within 0. However, a Rolex that costs thousands more doesn't include the solar charging or atomic clock sync will never be as accurate as my watch, and requires more effort.

Still, a Rolex has the perception of higher value. The fact that it says "totally discharged" in the manual does not mean that the cell has been discharged to zero, merely that it has been discharged as far as the calibration process will take it or until the safety circuitry kicks in, whichever comes soonest.

There are women in the world that will possibly fuck you because you have a Rolex. If a woman is fucking you because of your Rolex, you're probably getting fucked in more ways than one. Not necessarily.

Look at Donald Trump, for instance, and his latest wife. She's beautiful enough to be a model, but he's butt-ugly and a lot older than her to boot. There's no way a guy like that would attract a woman like that if it weren't for his money, and the money he spends on her is probably worth it in his mind to have someone that attractive on his arm and in his bed, even if it basically does mean she's a high-priced full-time prostitute. If he had only looked for women that loved him for his.

It says to complete a full charge cycle at least once a month. The only section that mentions a full discharge says that you shouldn't store devices fully discharged for extended periods of time - but on the flip side, it also says that you shouldn't leave it fully charged all the time either. I don't know of any chemical system whereby periodic deep cycling is considered good for the cells even Ni-Cads: the memory effect is real, but you still don't need to deep cycle the th.

You cannot full-drain one of these devices without physically disassembling it.If you have a Nissan or Infiniti vehicle with the in vehicle entertainment system, you probably noticed that USB was an optional video source. You might have even put some videos on a flash drive and tried to play them. But as ofthe Nissan system is still using a 13 year old Codec called DivX. It's not the greatest quality, and the files are big, but it does work and it was really cheap for Nissan.

That being said, this guide will show you how to convert any videos you have, DVD rips, downloads or home videos, into the proper format so that you can play them in your car. Did you use this instructable in your classroom? Add a Teacher Note to share how you incorporated it into your lesson. The first thing you'll need to do is to compile a list of videos to put onto that flash drive. It's easiest if you put them all in one folder, but if you're organized, that's not really critical.

Most likely you're doing this for your kids so that you don't have to change discs or press play for them, after all this is ! I've found all sorts of great kids materials online and we've ripped several movies for them. A great idea is two Flash drives, one with short clips for short trips, and other discs full of full length videos.

Since you can often get a digital copy when you buy a Blu-Ray, you can use those too. Now you'll need to convert those videos into a format your car can recognize.

To do this, you'll need to do what's called "Transcoding" which is to convert them from whatever format they are currently in, to a DivX compatible format with the Right FourCC code. If you have a new computer, you probably have a 64Bit Operating System. You always want to use the Bit version of software if you can since it can use up all that powerful hardware without limitations. But if you try the 64 bit version and it doesn't work, just download the all windows versions.

To install it, just download the installer, run it and choose all of the defaults. It doesn't install any other junk, so you're safe. You can use any size flash drive from about 1GB up to 64GB, but you'll want to use a sufficiently sized flash drive!

nissan leaf software hack

This can either be your USB Flash drive or a local folder if you'd like to save the files for later use on additional devices. Try with just a single short video before doing a massive conversion! Now you just have to wait. A black DOS screen will come up as it converts the video, frame by frame into the right format. Depending on the speed of your computer and the amount of videos you're converting, this could take from 5 minutes for a single video clip up to hours for several full length films.

Just be patient. I'm using a Cruzer Glide but your's will probably be different. In you center console, you'll see a USB Port behind a little dummy door. Open that door and insert your flash drive.

Now power up your system. You can use either the front screen or the remote to change the source to USB. Press Play and Viola! You should start seeing your videos playing on screen. By default, they'll just play in alphabetical order which might be fine. If you'd like to change the order, just stick he drive back in your computer and put a number in front of each video. Since the system will sort by numbers before letters, it will let you order the videos however you'd like.

You also have the option of sorting files into folders which you can skip via the remote or the front screen. You can even press List button to see all of the files on disc. In case you didn't know, you won't be able to see the video on the front screen unless you press the parking brake.Quick links.

My Nissan Leaf. Updating Leaf Software and Firmware. Updating Leaf Software and Firmware Wed Apr 28, pm Has Nissan designed the software system so that it can be easily updated "in the field", without a possibly long and costly trip to a dealer? If so, bug fixes yes, there will be some and feature upgrades will allow an evolution of the Leaf system, and even some experiments, tests, diagnostics, or data gathering that were not even conceived or considered at roll-out.

Yes, it would not be called a "bug fix", it would be a "performance enhancement". Re: Updating Leaf Software and Firmware Wed Apr 28, pm I would be very surprised if Nissan or any car company would set up a system that allows software updates any other way than through a dealer.

Any type of "open" system would encourage users to do their own mucking with the software. And although someone will probably create Leaf hacks anyway, the harder Nissan makes it to hack, the less likely Joe Sixpack is going to do the mod. Any car company does not want bad press from problems experienced in their cars even if it's not the car company's fault.

With a new system like the Leaf, Nissan is going to be even more cautious. Depending on what kind of "cellular service" the Leaf has, it might be technically possible for them to do over-the-air updates. I just don't see it happening. It's one thing for my DirecTV box to get an update automatically and stop working -- it's quite another for my car to do that.

I expect Nissan would want any updates to be done through a dealer so the whole system can be checked out after the update and confirm that it updated properly. Geek in me: Cool idea! Driver in me: No thanks! The file might even be VIN-specific. Perhaps the "Update" could only be done while immobilized by charge mode, or some such. The very rare failed update fails the self-check might require a dealer reset, full re-install, etc.

If worried, one could always go to a dealer and have them plug in the ThunbDrive, right? Hacking, to some extent, is always a risk, but good security, different encryption for each VIN, etc. Novel approach: Publish the software openly and give prizes for finding "unknown features that will be unavailable on future versions". Yep, on my planet, we just call them "bugs". Load more posts. Contact Us Upgrade your account Contact us Advertise.What if a car could be controlled from a computer halfway around the world?

Computer security researcher and hacker Troy Hunt has managed to do just that, via a web browser and an Internet connection, with an unmodified Nissan Leaf in another country. Using the same methods as the app itself, any other Nissan Leaf could be controlled as well, from pretty much anywhere.

Slashdot Top Deals

Hunt made contact with another security researcher and Leaf-owner, Scott Helme. If you look in that code, you can see that part of the request includes a tag for VIN, which is the Vehicle Identification Number obfuscated here of the car.

Changing this VIN is really all you need to do to access any particular Leaf. Remember, VIN are visible through the windshield of every car, by law. Hunt describes the process on his site, and notes some alarming details:. In other words, he was accessing the API anonymously.

And it gets worse. This time, personal information about Jan was returned, namely his user ID which was a variation of his actual name. The VIN passed in the request also came back in the response and a result key was returned.

He then turned the climate control off and watched as the app issued this request:. All of these requests were made without an auth token of any kind; they were issued anonymously. Jan checked them by loading them up in Chrome as well and sure enough, the response was returned just fine. Hunt proved this was possible after some work, using a tool to generate Leaf VINs only the last 5 or 6 digits are actually different and sending a request for battery status to those VINs.

Soon, they got the proper response back. Hunt explains the significance:. Our suspicion that the VIN was the only identifier required was confirmed and it became clear that there was a complete lack of auth on the service. Anyone could potentially enumerate VINs and control the physical function of any vehicles that responded. I reported it to Nissan the day after we discovered this I wanted Jan to provide me with more information firstyet as of today — 32 days later — the issue remains unresolved.

Not only is there the huge privacy issue of having your comings-and-goings logged and available, but if someone wanted to, they could crank the AC and drain the battery of a Leaf without too much trouble, stranding the owner somewhere. This is a huge security breach that Nissan needs to address as soon as possible. I reached out to Nissan for comment on this story and will update as soon as I get one. So far, Nissan has not fixed this after at least 32 days, Hunt said.

All in all, I sent ten emails there was some to-and-fro and had one phone call. I do want to make it clear though that especially in the earlier discussions, Nissan handled this really well. It was easy to get in touch with the right people quickly and they made the time to talk and understand the issue.

They were receptive and whilst I obviously would have liked to see this rectified quickly, compared to most ethical disclosure experiences security researches have, Nissan was exemplary. After all, doing so will save them from PR headaches like this, and the likely forthcoming stories your aunt will Facebook you about how the terrorists are going to make all the Leafs hunt us down like dogs. Contact the author at jason jalopnik.

The A. Shop Subscribe.Want to read Slashdot from your mobile device? Point it at m. Perhaps Nissan knows something about their batteries and BMS that he doesn't, and the false zero reading is there to ensure the batteries last as long as they're intended to?

Last I heard, you weren't supposed to completely discharge lithium batteries if you wanted to ensure a usefully long service life. Taking cells all the way to 'zero' in a battery is generally a bad plan, it both stresses the cells more - discharging them at high currents at the very end of the discharge is harsh on them, causes extra wear due to deeper cycle life, and risks overdischarging weaker cells in the battery.

Li-Ion doesn't like full discharges, and in fact the internal circuitry should make it impossible. Lead-acid will very quickly become unusable if left fully discharged.

And for battery packs, full discharge risks cell reversal, which causes damage. The only case where you should still do that is when there is some sort of internal statistics being kept of how long the battery is estimated to last, which is out of sync with the actual battery.

That's not for any sort of cleaning though. It's just for fixing incorrect estimations of remaining battery time, which causes devices to turn off too soon, or have them fail to shut down nicely before the battery runs out. It's worth noting that even in this case, the cells don't actually go to zero - in LiIon batteries, the circuitry cuts out at about 3V per cell.

Lower than that, and damage WILL occur. I've come across this kind of thing on other "high-end" Li-Ion batteries too, including on laptops, a high-end GPS unit and a satellite comms system. I've never seen this kind of thing on cheaper clones, in lower-end devices like phones, or in any other gadgets where the battery might be regarded as disposable once it deteriorates.

Unless the battery in question has a means of asking for a calibration charge, or some such, and a charger that has a dedicated mode for doing so, then you should always try and recharge the battery before it fully drains. Your perception is its "high end" because it gets you involved in the recalibration process. The cheap ones recalibrate, they just don't let you know, therefore you perceive them as cheaper.

Used Nissan LEAF battery hacking (SOH)

No, it isn't so simple. There are many examples of expensive devices requiring many more manual steps because it gives the perception of value. Other times, it is simply a status thing. For example, I have a solar powered watch that is synced to the atomic clock in Colorado every morning. My watch will always be within 0.

However, a Rolex that costs thousands more doesn't include the solar charging or atomic clock sync will never be as accurate as my watch, and requires more effort.Related: F CA Recalls 1.

Hunt was able to access the Leaf computer to document recent trips, power usage information, charge levels, and more. While the latter might sound like the perfect recipe for a prank, the available data could also easily be leveraged by criminals, and non-native app functions could conceivably be made available to a skilled programmer. Hunt showed that access to any Leaf is possible thanks to a shielded code request where the VIN can be exchanged at will.

With these findings in hand, Hunt reported the security risks to Nissan. Hunt did clarify that he was able to get in touch with the right people at the automaker post-haste, but the lack of security within the native app is still concerning. The best sci-fi movies on Netflix right now 4 hours ago. The best PS1 games of all time 18 hours ago.

nissan leaf software hack

The 50 best shows on Amazon Prime right now 3 days ago. The best used car websites for April 2, What is Android Auto? April 2, The best convertibles for April 2, The best camper vans April 2, The best car-sharing apps for April 2, Lucid Air electric car completes mile loop between San Francisco and L. Honda will use General Motors technology to build two electric cars April 3, How to disable Apple CarPlay April 3, Why driverless cars are ugly, and how BMW plans to change that April 7, Quick links.

My Nissan Leaf. My first and so far only Hack is to add a small microcontroller circuit to "fake" the OK button press as soon as the unit powers up: Obviously this was accomplished without altering any code, but a more elegant way would be to patch the code to eliminate this any several other annoyances. Great information! One hack I would LOVE to see is a bluetooth hack that makes the LEAF activate directly into handsfree mode when you hit the phone or speech button on the steering wheel.

That is to say, bypass any built in functionality and connect directly to the phone. This would make it MUCH easier to use Siri on the iPhone, or any other phone with better voice control than what's built in. What do you think the odds of being able to do that are? Can I come be your understudy? Ingineer wrote: My first and so far only Hack is to add a small microcontroller circuit to "fake" the OK button press as soon as the unit powers up:.

Front and back? I'm confused. Is the flash on the CPU or is it external? What we need are some Nissan service manuals. I know of at least one LEAF technician on the forums.

Nissan Leaf electric cars hack vulnerability disclosed

On a number of older Clarion WinCE sat navs, the password to access map and software update menu items isthough I doubt this will help. I don't have my LEAF yet, so I have no way to dig into the menus and see if there's an option to enter a password.

nissan leaf software hack

I'm sure Nissan isn't using stock Clarion software. Of the months I've owned my LEAF, the only time I have pulled up the range map is to show someone what that button did when asked. Switching between that and other screens, a shortcut to get to it would be awesome.

Load more posts. Contact Us Upgrade your account Contact us Advertise.


thoughts on “Nissan leaf software hack

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *